Osteopathy

Osteopathy is a recognised system of diagnosis and treatment that lays its main emphasis on the structural integrity of the body. In other words, osteopathy believes that symptoms often stem from disruptions in the function of the body. These disruptions may be corrected through osteopathic treatment, thus hopefully relieving the distress and discomfort experienced by people.

“An osteopath looks at the body as a whole, not just the area that is afflicted”
  • Osteopaths do not look on patients simply as “symptom sufferers” but as individuals with their own unique requirements for health. An osteopath looks at the body as a whole, not just the area that is afflicted; so every patient is assessed from a mechanical, functional and postural standpoint.
  • A treatment plan is individually tailored to suit each patient’s particular requirements. Each treatment consists of a series of manual corrections, employing a variety of osteopathic techniques that affect both the muscles and the joints.
  • What is great about osteopathy is that we are not limited to using one particular technique. If you are not comfortable with some forms of techniques, there are many different ways we can approach treatment.
 *Osteopathy is generally considered safe but may cause adverse reactions in some people   *If you are not comfortable with some forms of techniques, there are many different ways we can approach treatment” 

Current university training for an osteopath is five years full time that includes an undergraduate and a masters degree. Osteopaths must be registered with the Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency (AHPRA).

 

Osteopathy may help people of all ages from babies to children to teenagers to adults, as well as pregnant women and the elderly.

 

Some conditions that osteopaths may help to manage include:
  • Aches and pains
  • Arthritic pain
  • Backache
  • Tennis Elbow
  • Frozen shoulder
  • Headaches
  • Joint pain
  • Neck pain
  • Rheumatic pain
  • Sciatica
  • General Tensions